Massage Information
Find all free  massage news here...

'Supplying Free Information To Massage Therapists Worldwide'
 

 


Massage Blogs ] Acutonics ] Art of Massage ] Ulnar Nerve ] Contact ] Do's and Don'ts ] Essential Oils ] Marma Point ] Infant Massage ] Benefits of Massage ] Massage Articles ] Massage History ] Massage for Diabetes ] Massage Styles ] Massage Videos ] Prenatal Massage ] State Regulations ] Make Massage Oil ] Massage Tools ] Mesothelioma Massage ]

Is prenatal massage for you?
Massage during pregnancy is usually safe for most mothers. Your massage therapist will want to know if you are having any problems or complications with your pregnancy before you begin. If you are, then your therapist will require approval from your primary health care provider before proceeding with any bodywork. The following are circumstances in which massage should not be performed:

  • heavy discharge (watery or bloody);
  • diabetes;
  • contagious illness;
  • fever;
  • vomiting;
  • unusual pain;
  • pre-eclampsia;
  • high blood pressure;
  • morning sickness;
  • abdominal pain;
  • diarrhea;
  • any malignant condition.

Areas of the body that should not be massaged include:

  • skin rashes, open sores, bruises;
  • inflammation;
  • raised or distended varicose veins;
  • local infection sites.

In addition to these areas, one other precaution needs to be mentioned: Direct and sustained pressure should not be applied to the area between the ankle bone and heel. This area is considered by many massage therapists and reflexologists to relate with the uterus and vagina, and it is thought that heavy pressure to this area could promote early labor. Assuming there are no other precautions or considerations, it should be all right to massage the rest of the feet.

Massage pointers
Because of the tremendous physical and hormonal changes that occur in the expectant mother, I do not recommend any massage during the first trimester. In my opinion, this is the time for the mother to get comfortable with being pregnant. The second and third trimesters are wonderful times to begin prenatal massage.

I do not recommend massaging so deeply that pain is ever felt. The most effective guide for determining proper pressure is open communication between the mom and whoever is massaging her.

An unscented lotion is best to use as a lubricant, since many pregnant women have an aversion to strong odors. The person giving the massage should have short, trim and smooth nails, and should avoid wearing any watches, rings or other jewelry that might cut skin or make noise to distract from the experience. The massage should be done in a quiet area away from phones, traffic, children, pets, etc. Soft and soothing music can add to the relaxation and comfort of the mom-to-be. The room should be well ventilated -- having a fan circulating the air is a good idea.

The person giving the massage should have short, trim and smooth nails, and should avoid wearing any watches, rings or other jewelry that might cut skin or make noise to distract from the experience.

Massage can be performed anywhere from 10 minutes to one hour, depending on how much time you have and how much discomfort you are experiencing. Once a week during the second trimester is great, and twice a week or more, during the third trimester is wonderful. In my practice and in my teaching, I have found that my pregnant clients appreciate their massage therapy appointments because they know relief is at hand. They look forward to their weekly appointments to ease recurring problems, such as sciatica, leg cramps, and back and round ligament pain. I hope pregnancy massage eases any discomfort you may be feeling, too.

 
 

 

We are currently having a special for all visitors to our site: Click Link Below
Free Massage Oils and Lotions Samples*

*$7.99 s/h

 

 

 
 

 

   

All graphics, logos, advertisements and promotions are Copyright http://www.massagelotion.net 2006

Hit Counter